Chartered Physiotherapist specialising in animals. (Dorset/Wiltshire based.)

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Physiotherapy

All types of animals and people can benefit from physiotherapy for a range of conditions. Veterinary physiotherapy is a beneficial and effective addition to veterinary care rather than a replacement.

Physiotherapy can help in the management of sports and performance, prevention of injury, recovery of injury and in promoting healthy and comfortable old age.

Why a Chartered Physiotherapist?

Chartered Physiotherapists are trained to the highest of standards, qualifying to treat people by completing a degree (BSc) at University, to achieve an advanced knowledge of anatomy, movement and function. This allows them to become members of the Health Professions Council (HPC) and the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (CSP) which work hard to regulate the profession.

If they want to specialise in animals, they can undergo an approved postgraduate course (Royal Veterinary College, Liverpool, UWE) to become qualified in assessing and treating animals, achieving an MSc or Postgraduate Diploma in Veterinary Physiotherapy. This enables them to become members of a specialist branch of CSP, known as the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Animal Therapy (ACPAT). You can check if a Veterinary Physiotherapist is also a Chartered Physiotherapist by looking on the ACPAT register (see links).

Members of CSP, HPC and ACPAT have a duty to maintain a portfolio of continuous professional development, proving that they are practicing with the best knowledge and evidence in mind. By choosing a physiotherapist with these memberships you can be reassured that they will treat you, your horse, your dog or cat with methods proven to have worked!

The British Olympic team have chosen an ACPAT Veterinary Physiotherapist since 1992 to travel with them and treat their horses.

Chartered Physiotherapists and ACPAT Veterinary Physiotherapists are fully insured.

Please be aware that the term "Chartered Physiotherapist" is protected, however, the term "Veterinary Physiotherapist" isn't, therefore please take care to check the qualifications of any therapist you use.

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